Blogs

Three Reasons You Should Be Talking About Root Canals

To the average patient, no procedure is more dreaded than the root canal, despite the fact that it can be painless and preserve the natural tooth with excellent clinical outcomes.

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Fighting Cavities with Tea?

New research reveals that polyphenols in beverages such as black tea may have the power to disrupt bacterial metabolism and reduce inflammation in the oral mucosa.

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Alzheimer's Drug Found to Regenerate Dentin

Bizarre new use for Alzheimer's disease drug mobilizes tertiary dentin mechanism to rebuild significant tooth structure for restoration.

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How to Dismiss a Troublesome Patient in Three Easy Steps

As part of preparing for 2017, consider removing sources of stress from your practice like patients who are rude, argumentative, or chronically absent from scheduled appointments.

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Question about New Sedation Regulations

California's state sedation regulations have been in the news recently for potential changes being made to the way sedation permits are dispensed. DOCS regulatory attorney John Bitting weighs in.

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5 Great Ideas for a Better Practice in 2017

Wondering how to improve your practice in the new year? Check out these great tips to increase efficiency, bring in more patients and de-stress your life!

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How to Clean Your Teeth Like a Caveman

Archaeologists discover hidden evidence that the concept of toothbrushing may be far older than previously thought – older even the ancient Egyptians.

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Ray Bard’s Collection of Quotes is Intended to Help Salespeople, But Dentists Will Also Discover Inspiration in its Pages

Whether they realize it or not, dentists are in the business of persuasion, a.k.a. “sales.” Author Ray Bard asked more than 1,200 quote judges to help him select the 324 quotes he showcases in Fired Up! Selling, his bestselling book designed to inspire, energize, and help its readers succeed.

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Uncontrollable Sneezing Following Routine Appointment

A patient undergoes some standard treatment on her anterior maxillary dentition, and after leaving the office calls in to say she has been sneezing uncontrollably for hours!

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Fascinating Cloves - the Dentist's Holiday Spice

Clove oil is often used as a mild analgesic in dentistry for toothaches and denture sore spots, but cloves and their chemical components have seen medicinal use for centuries!

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A DOCS Education member seeks the faculty’s assistance:

I am an endodontist who has received a referral for a 31-year-old caucasian male with a history of methemoglobinemia in response to esophageal benzocaine spray. The patient needs two root canals on vital teeth #4 and #19 and seven fillings.

After reviewing the literature with my local anesthesiologist's help, bupivacaine seems to be the medication with the least amount of risk. The recommendation from the anesthesiologist is not to perform sedation in the office, other than possibly nitrous as well as having an IV ready for up to 50 mgs TOP DOSE of methylene blue 1.0 -2.0 mg/kg IV every 60 minutes and very small amounts of bupivacaine per session. The other option would be general anesthesia.

What are your thoughts?


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A DOCS Education Member seeks the faculty’s assistance:

I had a 24-year-old, recovering drug addicted female weighing 142 lb presents with multiple caries. She will require extractions, implants and dentures. Her rehab therapy medications are Suboxone® 8 mg two times daily along with 12.5 mg of Klonopin® daily. The patient is anxious about her dental treatment. She states she can come off these meds two days before her appointment. Is this ok and is there an OCS protocol for her?


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A DOCS Education member seeks the faculty’s assistance:

I have a patient who has a GFR of 31. I understand that the normal GFR is 131 to 140 and that the minimum acceptable level is 60.

The patient's nephrologist said he considers the patient stable and that she could under-go anesthesia. However, he acknowledged he did not understand which type of anesthesia we would be using.

He also said that any medications utilized should be dose adjusted for her GFR. Should I stay away from treating her totally? Or, with him considering her stable is there a way that I can treat her with local anesthesia and sedation safely?


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A DOCS Education member seeks the faculty’s assistance:

I would like to get all suggestions for sedating a 79-year-old female with a pacemaker and a history of heart problems. The patient is on clonazepam, 81 mg aspirin, verapamil, digoxin, hydroxychlorine, levothyroxine, meloxicam, metropolol, saccurate(?), Nitrostat® and potassium. Her MD has instructed us not to use any epinephrine. The patient is allergic to penicillin and MD suggested clindamycin, which is what I will prescribe.


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A DOCS Education member seeks the faculty’s assistance:

I have a patient who is ASA III, Mallampati 2, base line BP 135/86 Spo2 98%. The patient has depression, stable angina, high blood pressure, hyperlipidemia and arthritis. Last exam was 3 weeks ago.


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A DOCS Education member has an upcoming diabetic patient who takes their medication, but does not monitor their blood sugar. How will this affect a planned, upcoming sedation dentistry procedure?


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