Blogs

Unexpected Antibacterial Effect Observed in Bio-Ceramic Compound

Could the newly-discovered antibacterial effect of a bio-ceramic be used to curb the periodontitis epidemic in America?

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Sedation Interactions with Multiple Anti-Retroviral Drugs

Genvoya® contains four medications in one dose for the treatment of HIV.

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Understanding the Role of Social Media Marketing

Social media is an enormous marketing platform ignored by the majority of dentists. Read these tips from SolutionReach on how to use social media to your practice's advantage!

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Ace Chat – Working to Make a Difference for Your Patients on Your Website

Find out how using a chat service can increase your website retention, attract new patients and give your practice an unparalleled level of service.

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Gum Disease Tied to Glaucoma - Implications for Sedation Dentists

Gum disease presents a surprising risk for glaucoma, reports a new study from Harvard Medical School. What does this mean for sedation patients?

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Minimal Sedation Options for Heavy Gagger

How should a clinician approach helping a patient who needs sedation primarily for its effect in reducing the gag reflex? DOCS Education faculty weigh in.

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Dispensing Sedation Meds: In-Office or Pharmacy?

DEA compliance is a serious topic, and not all dentists want to deal with the hassle of dispensing drugs from their office. What's the best option?
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Fascinating Imagery of Cavitation Bubbles Reveals Ultrasonic Potential

Through high-speed photography and microscopy, researchers have identified a key property of ultrasonic hand scalers, and how new tip designs might make SRP more comfortable and effective.
Tags: ultrasonic, dentistry, cavitation

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Why are forensic scientists pulling bite mark analysis?

An influential commission of forensic science experts has called for the end of using bite mark analysis as evidence.

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Harnessing the power of positivity in pediatric dentistry

Do pediatric cases make you tense up? Are you unsure how to best set a child at ease? Dr. Barbara Sheller discusses ICCPD's course on pediatric patient managment.

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A member of DOCS Education writes: I have a 55 year old female being treated for central adrenal insufficiency, multiple sclerosis, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, ADD, hypothyroidism and hormone replacement therapy. All are well controlled at this time. Her physician has recommended tripling her dose of Cortef® the day of surgery. She has been a patient for years and is very relaxed in the chair, even for long appointments.
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A Member of DOCS Education asks: I have a 61 year old, 175 lbs female patient requiring a long sedation appointment. She is currently taking Advair®, Cartia XT®, losartan HCT and fenofibrate. Due to the medication interactions we cannot use diazepam or triazolam. Would it be possible for me to use lorazepam the night before, and if so, at what dosage should it be administered? Then at what incremental and loading dose should the lorazepam be given an hour prior to the appointment? After assessing the patient on arrival, what dose of hydroxyzine should be given? Finally, what incremental doses of lorazepam should be given at what intervals?
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A member of DOCS Education writes: I have been sedating patients for over ten years but I wanted your help. I have an 85 year old insulin-dependent diabetic patient that has requested sedation. Her BP reads 146/74, pulse 69. She takes 20 units of Lantus® insulin at 100 unit/ML once a day and 15 units of Humalog® insulin at 100 unit/Ml once a day. If I were to sedate her, should she eat a small dinner and her normal small breakfast and not take any insulin on the day of sedation? Other medications the patient is taking are: amlodipine 5mg, lovastatin 40 mg, quinapril GCL 10 mg, HCTZ 12.5 mg, aspirin 325 mg, 2 x 220 mg Aleve®, CalCarb 600/D 600-400 MG-unit. The patient does not have asthma or any breathing issues but I don't feel comfortable with sedation.
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A member of DOCS Education asks: I have a patient interested in sedation but I have several concerns with her health. The patient has lupus, sarcoidoisis and rheumatoid arthritis. My practice is located in VA and, therefore, I am only able to use single dose protocols. With the fact that she takes Azathrioprine, Ventolin® and Hydroxycholorquine for her systemic issues, would you recommend IV sedation instead of oral? Patient is coming in tomorrow for a consultation and I have been waiting to get the medical consults back. Her primary care physician took no issue with the use of normal protocols, but I am not comfortable doing that. I have yet to hear from her pulmonary physician or the rheumatoid doctor. What would your advice be for this case? Thank you.
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A member of DOCS Education writes: Our office has been doing oral conscious sedation for several years now and, thankfully, we have never faced an emergency situation with a patient. There are two questions that arise from my patients and my staff that we would appreciate input on.
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A member of DOCS Education writes: I have an upcoming patient who is a 21-year-old male with Landau-Kleffner syndrome that is to be sedated for a two-surface filling. The patient was seen by another dentist four years ago, and at that time was given two .25mg tabs of Triazolam prior to dental work. The patient has Autism-type movements and struggles to sit still, making monitoring difficult.
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