Blogs

What Does 400,000-Year-Old Tartar Tell Us?

Anthropologists are gaining insight into the lives of prehistoric humans using data gathered from ancient teeth. What researchers are discovering is amazing.

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Can I get Alzheimer's from that Root Canal?

Does that seem like a ridiculous question to you? Unfortunately, it's not so preposterous according to a new study published in the Journal Nature.

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The Role of the Dentist in Controlling Blood Pressure for a Sedation Appointment

Should you be trying to control a patient's blood pressure with medication before, during or after a sedation appointment? A DOCS Education member wonders why DOCS Education courses don't cover this topic. Drs. Wellbrock and Goyal advise.

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Big Potential in the Oral Microbiome

700-plus. That's the current estimate for the number of different bacteria types that live in the human oral cavity. Major advances in DNA sequencing technologies are opening up new areas of research into the human microbiome. Study results already look promising.

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Caught Between Sucrose and Sucralose: A Dentist’s Dilemma

Americans are addicted to sweet, but both sugar and artificial sweeteners have serious health risks. How can dentists help patients understand the consequences of their sugary addictions? Get the facts, sweetheart.

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Previous Allergic Reaction to IV Sedation a Reason for Concern?

A patient needs sedation for a root canal and extraction. However, the patient reports that years ago she was intubated after IV sedation; she has since been IV sedated without any incidence. Should the doctor proceed with oral conscious sedation?

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Why Pediatric Dentistry Makes Sense in 2015

Once upon a time, dentists believed that treating pediatric patients was a fast track to a dead-end career. Wake up, sleeping beauties! Times have changed—pediatric dentistry ain't what it used to be.
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How Are You Giving Back to Your Community?

Volunteer time? Dental service trips? Mentoring or teaching? There are a lot of ways to use your skills and knowledge to help people beyond your daily routine of appointments and consultations. We've got a few extraordinary examples for you in the Summer issue of DOCS Digest - the digital edition is here!

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Can amoxicillin cause light-headedness in a patient who is allergic to penicillin?

A 91-year-old patient is taking 500 mg of amoxicillin leading up to a sedation appointment and is experiencing dizziness. The patient is allergic to penicillin. A DOCS Education Member seeks the advice of DOCS Education faculty for next steps.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy + Sedation Dentistry: The Silver Bullet for Anxious Patients?

New research from Sweden finds that people with dental anxiety respond well to a specific kind of mental health counseling called cognitive behavioral therapy. When combined with sedation dentistry it could be the silver bullet patients with dental fear have been looking for.

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A member of DOCS Education poses a simple question to the forums: What are your thoughts on capnography for moderate oral conscious sedation cases? Is anybody on the forums doing this currently?
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A DOCS Education Member asks: We have a fearful 50 year-old female who is requesting sedation in our office. She claims a history of chest pains, shortness of breath and ulcers. Additionally she has had gallbladder and ovarian cyst surgery and a past skin disease, she has been diagnosed bipolar, has a thyroid condition and COPD per her pulmonologist. The patient also smokes, snores, has frequent headaches, chronic dry mouth and exhibits psychogenic polydipsia.
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Medication interactions are no joke, and neither are government regulations. A member of DOCS Education concerned with the amount of medications that his upcoming sedation patient is taking offers to fax the patient’s records to DOCS Education faculty for a more thorough analysis and recommendation. What happens next is an important lesson in keeping both your patients and your practice safe.
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A DOCS Education member writes: I have a 48 year-old female patient with an allergy to penicillin who is scheduled for a crown preparation which should take approximately 60 minutes. The patient takes no OTC or prescription medications, but has experienced rash and itching symptoms while using most pain medications. I spoke with the pharmacist who recommended using Hydroxyzine in tandem with Diazepam to reduce these itching symptoms. I understand that both drugs have CNS effects, so is it advisable that I prescribe both in tandem? My other concern is my state’s regulations; under the Minnesota anxiolysis guidelines and protocols can I prescribe both Diazepam and Hydroxyzine without issue?
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A member of DOCS Education writes: I have a 55 year old female being treated for central adrenal insufficiency, multiple sclerosis, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, ADD, hypothyroidism and hormone replacement therapy. All are well controlled at this time. Her physician has recommended tripling her dose of Cortef® the day of surgery. She has been a patient for years and is very relaxed in the chair, even for long appointments.
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A Member of DOCS Education asks: I have a 61 year old, 175 lbs female patient requiring a long sedation appointment. She is currently taking Advair®, Cartia XT®, losartan HCT and fenofibrate. Due to the medication interactions we cannot use diazepam or triazolam. Would it be possible for me to use lorazepam the night before, and if so, at what dosage should it be administered? Then at what incremental and loading dose should the lorazepam be given an hour prior to the appointment? After assessing the patient on arrival, what dose of hydroxyzine should be given? Finally, what incremental doses of lorazepam should be given at what intervals?
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