Blogs

Beware the "Mount Everest Toothache."

We all have patients who complain that a sore tooth feels like it's going to explode, but did you know this is actually possible in certain circumstances? Incisor takes a look at barodontalgia.

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Mouth-To-Body Infections: What's the Actual Risk?

Experts are conflicted on whether antibiotic prophylaxis is necessary to treat patients with heart stents, knee replacements or other implanted surgical appliances. Get the facts here.

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Sedation of Patients with Benzodiazepine Allergy

What are the options when you cannot relieve a patient's anxiety with benzodiazepine medication? DOCS Education faculty weigh in.

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You'll Never Guess Which Famous People Used to Be Dentists

A career in dentistry can lead many places, from the Old West to the Silver Screen. Check out these historical and contemporary figures who got their start on the humble handpiece.

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"My Patient Eats Bricks!" – Problematic Patterns in Patients with Pica

Lots of activities can cause dental damage, but what do you do about patients who are compelled to eat non-food items?

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Moving Forward After a Break-In

When a DOCS member experiences a break-in damaging her DEA Cabinet, what should she do to continue serving the patients scheduled for the next day?

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Study Finds Women Predisposed to Develop Dry Socket

An analysis published in the Journal of the American Dental Association suggests that women may be predisposed to alveolar osteitis as a result of higher estrogen.

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Oral Cancer Risk may be Increased by Gum Disease Bacteria

Periodontitis associated bacteria have been found to secrete metabolic by-products that could lead to an increased risk for a type of oral cancer.

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Flossing for the High Score - Motivation in the 21st Century

Could goal-tracking software help patients maintain oral hygiene? The next step in getting patients to floss might be one of these apps.

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Promising New Painkillers in Development

Could researchers be on the brink of discovering a brand-new class of painkillers?

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A DOCS Education member asks: I have a patient that I plan on doing a RCT under sedation. Health hx normal. Allergic to Morphine and NSAID. Meds taking: estrogen, metroprolol tartrate. BP: 146/74, Pulse: 66, SPO2: 99. She said Valium didn't do much for her before, and one dentist had tried to do IV sedation on her and she was awake the whole time and "felt everything he did". My initial plan is do single Dose Protocol #3 with diazepam 5 mg night before, triazolam 0.25 mg and hydroxyzine 25 mg one hr before procedure. Is it worth the try or would another protocol be better served for this patient?
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A DOCS Education member asks: My first teen sedation patient will be coming into the office in a few days and I have a couple of questions I hope you can answer for me. The patient is a 14 year-old female weighing 106 lbs, taking no medications and has an unremarkable medical history. Her main complaint is anxiety of shots from a previous dental experience. Her treatment will consist of #18-0, #19-O and #31-O composites. I plan on using Teen Protocol 2.
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A member of DOCS Education poses a simple question to the forums: What are your thoughts on capnography for moderate oral conscious sedation cases? Is anybody on the forums doing this currently?
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A DOCS Education Member asks: We have a fearful 50 year-old female who is requesting sedation in our office. She claims a history of chest pains, shortness of breath and ulcers. Additionally she has had gallbladder and ovarian cyst surgery and a past skin disease, she has been diagnosed bipolar, has a thyroid condition and COPD per her pulmonologist. The patient also smokes, snores, has frequent headaches, chronic dry mouth and exhibits psychogenic polydipsia.
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Medication interactions are no joke, and neither are government regulations. A member of DOCS Education concerned with the amount of medications that his upcoming sedation patient is taking offers to fax the patient’s records to DOCS Education faculty for a more thorough analysis and recommendation. What happens next is an important lesson in keeping both your patients and your practice safe.
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A DOCS Education member writes: I have a 48 year-old female patient with an allergy to penicillin who is scheduled for a crown preparation which should take approximately 60 minutes. The patient takes no OTC or prescription medications, but has experienced rash and itching symptoms while using most pain medications. I spoke with the pharmacist who recommended using Hydroxyzine in tandem with Diazepam to reduce these itching symptoms. I understand that both drugs have CNS effects, so is it advisable that I prescribe both in tandem? My other concern is my state’s regulations; under the Minnesota anxiolysis guidelines and protocols can I prescribe both Diazepam and Hydroxyzine without issue?
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