Blogs

Minimal Sedation Options for Heavy Gagger

How should a clinician approach helping a patient who needs sedation primarily for its effect in reducing the gag reflex? DOCS Education faculty weigh in.

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Dispensing Sedation Meds: In-Office or Pharmacy?

DEA compliance is a serious topic, and not all dentists want to deal with the hassle of dispensing drugs from their office. What's the best option?
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Fascinating Imagery of Cavitation Bubbles Reveals Ultrasonic Potential

Through high-speed photography and microscopy, researchers have identified a key property of ultrasonic hand scalers, and how new tip designs might make SRP more comfortable and effective.
Tags: ultrasonic, dentistry, cavitation

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Why are forensic scientists pulling bite mark analysis?

An influential commission of forensic science experts has called for the end of using bite mark analysis as evidence.

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Harnessing the power of positivity in pediatric dentistry

Do pediatric cases make you tense up? Are you unsure how to best set a child at ease? Dr. Barbara Sheller discusses ICCPD's course on pediatric patient managment.

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Methadone and Oral Sedation

Methadone is a powerful opioid used for maintenance treatment as part of the process of treating opioid dependency.

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Seizures Induced by Dental Fear

When a patient seizes during a routine hygiene appointment, their companion mentions that it may be due to acute dental fear. Can the clinician safely provide this patient a comfortable experience?

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Why You Should Ask Your Patients About Their Sleeping Habits

Could sleeping tendencies and oral health be connected? A new study implicates sleeping habits as a potential source of enamel erosion.

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New Study Links Higher Amelogenin Levels To Healthier Enamel

Genetic predisposition to weaker or stronger enamel might influence caries formation more than previously thought.

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Pre-Sedation Baseline Vitals

A DOCS Education Gold member inquires:

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A member of DOCS Education needs clarification on what constitutes a sedation protocol, as well as the proper procedure for their patient.
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A member of DOCS Education asks:

I am showing some [D] interactions on Lexicomp for triazolam, diazepam, hydroxyzine and Ambien® as well as Norco®. We could skip the Ambien®, but I still have concerns about the Norco®. Any suggestions? This is a chronic pain patient.

Thanks


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A member of DOCS Education asks:

It seems I have an abundance of cops and nurses in the practice, and all seem to be taking some form of anti-anxiety meds or BP meds. Well, someone has to treat them and I have had great success with the DOCS protocol, but could use some suggestions here on an upcoming patient:

Patient is 5 9" / 220 lbs. He is a half-pack a day smoker. No snoring, or so he says. BP today was 148/89, HR 86'. I have seen diastolic pressure at 95 on a previous visit. Meds are as follows:


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A member of DOCS Education asks: My patient is a 21 year old female who presents for IV sedation and operative dentistry. She smokes 0.5 packs/day, reports she has bronchitis but has no medication for such. She also states she takes Depakote® for bipolar disorder and Propranolol for tachycardia. Lexicomp shows no interactions with the Depakote® and only a C rating for Fentanyl (a non-benzodiazepine) and Propranolol. No other interactions are listed.
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A Member of DOCS Education asks: The Sedation Dentistry Guidebook offers a form titled "Sedation Appointment Checklist." The checklist outlines some instructions specifically for smokers, specifically how long to refrain from smoking after a sedation appointment. To clarify, are we to use this form to communicate to patients how long they are not to smoke before their sedation appointment? I remember from the DOCS course that smokers were encouraged to smoke before and throughout the sedation appointment as needed. Do we offer this option to all patients that smoke, or only to those who smoke beyond a specific threshold of cigarettes per day? Off of that, what is the protocol for allowing a patient to smoke during the sedation appointment? Should we keep the pulse ox attatched to the patient and accompany them outside? Any clarification would be appreciated?
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A DOCS Education member brings this question to the forum: I would appreciate some input regarding this patient, a 56 year old female, 5 feet and 1.5 inches tall, 248 lbs. She is a non-smoker. I have an upcoming treatment appointment with her and I plan on using a Triazolam titration protocol with her starting with .25 mg of Triazolam one hour prior to her appointment. She reports the following medical conditions: Hypertension Diabetes Asthma Hay Fever Hypothyroidism Fibromyalgia
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