Blogs

Unexpected Antibacterial Effect Observed in Bio-Ceramic Compound

Could the newly-discovered antibacterial effect of a bio-ceramic be used to curb the periodontitis epidemic in America?

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Sedation Interactions with Multiple Anti-Retroviral Drugs

Genvoya® contains four medications in one dose for the treatment of HIV.

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Understanding the Role of Social Media Marketing

Social media is an enormous marketing platform ignored by the majority of dentists. Read these tips from SolutionReach on how to use social media to your practice's advantage!

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Ace Chat – Working to Make a Difference for Your Patients on Your Website

Find out how using a chat service can increase your website retention, attract new patients and give your practice an unparalleled level of service.

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Gum Disease Tied to Glaucoma - Implications for Sedation Dentists

Gum disease presents a surprising risk for glaucoma, reports a new study from Harvard Medical School. What does this mean for sedation patients?

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Minimal Sedation Options for Heavy Gagger

How should a clinician approach helping a patient who needs sedation primarily for its effect in reducing the gag reflex? DOCS Education faculty weigh in.

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Dispensing Sedation Meds: In-Office or Pharmacy?

DEA compliance is a serious topic, and not all dentists want to deal with the hassle of dispensing drugs from their office. What's the best option?
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Fascinating Imagery of Cavitation Bubbles Reveals Ultrasonic Potential

Through high-speed photography and microscopy, researchers have identified a key property of ultrasonic hand scalers, and how new tip designs might make SRP more comfortable and effective.
Tags: ultrasonic, dentistry, cavitation

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Why are forensic scientists pulling bite mark analysis?

An influential commission of forensic science experts has called for the end of using bite mark analysis as evidence.

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Harnessing the power of positivity in pediatric dentistry

Do pediatric cases make you tense up? Are you unsure how to best set a child at ease? Dr. Barbara Sheller discusses ICCPD's course on pediatric patient managment.

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A DOCS Education member seeks the faculty’s advice:

I had a partly successful appointment yesterday. My patient was a 54-year-old male heavy smoker with controlled bp, Mallampati class 3, had premed with 10mg diazepam the night before and 0.25mg triazolam in the AM before the appointment.


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Let’s pretend there’s a group of lawyers sitting in a room. What are the chances any of them know how to properly fill a tooth with the same finesse as a dentist? Practically zero!
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A DOCS Education member seeks the faculty’s assistance:

I have a 41-year-old female patient who takes 10 mg of doxepin twice daily.

I checked Lexicomp™ for any interactions with diazepam, but it did not list any. Before I proceed with treatment, I would like to confirm it is ok to give diazepam to a patient taking 10 mg of doxepin twice daily. Thank you!


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A DOCS Education member seeks the faculty’s assistance:

I’m seeking advice on a 47-year-old male patient. I believe he is an ASA II individual. His blood pressure and pulse are WNL (131/83 & 68). He has a history of arthritis, kidney disease (renal insufficiency which patient says is categorized as stage II chronic kidney problems related to the meds he's taking), and lastly HIV.


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University of Adelaide researcher Dr. Kylie Ellis has made an unusual discovery: stem cells from teeth can grow into brain-like cells. The research was conducted by Dr.
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A DOCS Education member seeks the faculty’s assistance:

I am an endodontist who has received a referral for a 31-year-old caucasian male with a history of methemoglobinemia in response to esophageal benzocaine spray. The patient needs two root canals on vital teeth #4 and #19 and seven fillings.

After reviewing the literature with my local anesthesiologist's help, bupivacaine seems to be the medication with the least amount of risk. The recommendation from the anesthesiologist is not to perform sedation in the office, other than possibly nitrous as well as having an IV ready for up to 50 mgs TOP DOSE of methylene blue 1.0 -2.0 mg/kg IV every 60 minutes and very small amounts of bupivacaine per session. The other option would be general anesthesia.

What are your thoughts?


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